cgs-banner-12.jpg

CGS Academic Year Lecturers

Leila Whitley

Lecturer

Emaillwhitley@ucsd.edu

s.-zarate.jpg

Fall Quarter 2019
CGS 2A: Intro to CGS – Key Terms & Concepts
CGS 114/ETHN 183: Gender, Race, Ethnicity, & Class

Winter Quarter 2020
CGS 106: Gender & the Law
CGS 121: Selected Topics in CGS – Gender, Race, & Migration

Spring Quarter 2020
CGS 100B: Conceptualizing Gender – Methods & Methodologies
CGS 122: Advanced Topics in CGS – Transnational & Third World Feminisms
 

Research Interests and Education

Leila Whitley’s research interests include feminist and queer theory, critical race feminisms, and the relationships between borders and bodies. She completed her PhD in Cultural Studies at Goldsmiths, University of London, her MA in Cultural Studies also at Goldsmiths, and her BA at McGill University. From 2016-18 she was a Marie Curie Postdoctoral Fellow at the Zukunftskolleg of the University of Konstanz, Germany, and before this was based in the Centre for Feminist Research at Goldsmiths, University of London. 


Karen Shelby

Lecturer

Email: kshelby@ucsd.edu

Fall Quarter 2019
CGS 100A: Conceptualizing Gender – Theoretical Approaches

Spring Quarter 2020
CGS 121: Selected Topics in CGS – Sex Education & Policy

Research Interests and Education 

Dr. Karen L. Shelby has been an Adjunct Professor at USD since Spring 2009, and is the Assistant Director of the Institute for Civil Civic Engagement. She teaches a range of courses including Sex, Power and Politics, Feminist Theory, Comparative Social Movements and Political Theory: Ancient to Modern. Her past research examined Simone de Beauvoir’s engagement with the Algerian War and Beauvoir’s everyday ethics of freedom. Current topics of research build on this notion of an everyday ethics.


Amanda Martin-Sandino

Lecturer

Amanda

Email: ams003@ucsd.edu

Spring Quarter 2020
CGS 125: Women of Color Writers

Research Interests and Education 

A second-generation Chilenx American, Amanda Martin Sandino is a scholar of disability, gender, race, and futurity at UC San Diego. Her work particularly interrogates the utopic as a theoretical space for populations historically designated disabled. She received her Ph.D. in Literature and MFA in Writing from UC San Diego, her MA in Cultural Studies from UW Bothell, her BA in Asian Studies from Seattle University, and her AA from Edmonds Community College. Her first book, Looking Beyond the Curtain: Disability Futurity and the Literary Wonderland, is scheduled for publication by McFarland Press in 2021.


Briana BrickleyBriana brickley

Lecturer

Email: bgbrickley@ucsd.edu

Spring Quarter 2020
CGS 111: Gender & the Body

Research Interests and Education 

Briana’s research and teaching interests draw on theories of affect and embodiment, queer of color critique, feminist theory, aesthetics, and postcolonial studies. She received her PhD in 2016 from the CUNY Graduate Center, and has an MA in English from New York University and a BA in English and Black Studies from UC Santa Barbara. Her work, which has been circulated at the conferences of the American Studies Association and Cultural Studies Association, and appears in ARIEL: A Review of International English Literature, focuses on various forms of inequality that get exaggerated under global capitalism. She has taught courses in English, Critical Theory, African American Studies, and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies.


Philomena LopezPhilomena Lopez

Associate-In

Email: pjlopezr@ucsd.edu

Spring Quarter 2020
CGS 137:  Latina Issues & Cultural Production

Research Interests and Education 

Philomena Lopez is a doctoral candidate in the Art History, Theory, and Criticism program at UCSD. Her specializations are in Chicana/o, U.S. Latinx, and Latin American art. Philomena earned her BA in Art History from UCLA in 2015 where she was a Ronald E. McNair Research Scholar.  Her monographic research that principally focuses on the art of Charles Bojorquez examines how a vernacular Chicano language rooted in working class communities concentrated on visual writing and materialized through spray paint in public areas is a practice that is in conversation with larger art historical movements of the 20thcentury.Philomena has worked and interned at various art institutions and across multiple departments at the Queens Museum, Fowler Museum at UCLA, Hammer Museum, and Armory Center for the Arts.